News & Insights

rss

Stay informed with the latest MRL, Food Additive and Company news from around the world.


April 25, 2013
N/A

On April 24, 2013, the European Commission announced an update to its document, “Practical guidance for applicants on the submission of applications on food additives, food enzymes and food flavourings.”

Information on applying for an authorization of food additives, food enzymes, and flavorings may be found in the Food and Feed Safety  section of the European Commission's website.  

The European Union's food additive use regulations are included in the International Food Additive Database

April 24, 2013
N/A

As reported earlier this month, Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) is currently considering a proposal to approve two new food additives, calcium acetate and calcium oxide.   The proposal was notified to the WTO this week, with a comment deadline of June 22, 2013.

This amendment will be included in the International Food Additive Database once it is established and in effect. Further information on Japan's food additive regulations can be found on MHLW's Food Additive page. 

April 24, 2013
N/A

On April 5th the Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS), formerly the Korean Food and Drug Administration, provided a presentation on the future of the Korean maximum residue level (MRL) regulatory system.  The presentation was given at the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Washington, DC and was also available via conference call.  The presentation was open to all interested industry stakeholders.

In their presentation the Korean official described the country's plans to move to a positive MRL regulation by 2016.  This means that Korea will no longer defer to Codex MRLs when a Korean national MRL is not established and MRLs currently derived from Korea's complex decision tree* would also be eliminated.  Once implemented, only national Korean MRLs will be used in the country.  Additionally, Korea has published a list of pesticide and veterinary drug MRLs that will be deleted.  These are for uses that are not registered in Korea and are planned to be removed from the Korean Food Code.  Finally, the new regulation will include a 0.01 part per million (ppm) default MRL, a list of pesticides exempt from the MRL requirement, and a list of prohibited pesticides.

Between now and 2016, Korea will be soliciting and reviewing import tolerance applications to establish additional Korean national MRLs.  Any compound that does not currently have a national Korean MRL, or for which there is no current registered use in Korea, will need to have an import tolerance established in Korea under this review system. 

Commodity groups and other interested parties will be responsible for identifying MRL needs in Korea and working with governments and registrants to submit the necessary information to Korea.  Korea will be seeking actual data packages for review.  They will consider summaries of Codex MRL data if submitted, but Codex summaries in themselves will not be sufficient for the establishment of Korean MRLs.  Korea expects submissions from governments or registrants with the required data.  Korea will try to harmonize MRLs with Codex when possible, but still will undertake full reviews of the submitted data packages.

US commodity groups plan to coordinate with the US government and registrants regarding future import tolerance submissions to ensure the most efficient use of resources.

Until this new MRL regulation is implemented in 2016, the current regulation remains in effect.

* Korea's MRL decision tree:

  1. Korean national MRL
  2. Codex MRL if established for specific commodity.  Korea does not accept Codex crop group MRLs.
  3. Lowest MRL for commodities in the same Korean crop subgroup as the commodity in question (e.g. for peach—lowest MRL listed for other Stone Fruits)
  4. Lowest MRL for commodities in the same Korean crop group as the commodity in question (e.g. for peach—lowest MRL listed for other Fruits)
  5. “Other Agricultural Product”
  6. MRL Lowest MRL established for the pesticide
April 24, 2013
N/A

Korea recently announced the renaming and restructuring of their Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS). Formerly operating as the Korean Food and Drug Administration (KFDA), the agency has been upgraded to ministry status. In addition to other food safety responsibilities, MFDS is responsible for authorizing and regulating food additive use in Korea.  Further information on these duties can be found on their Food Additives page.

Korea's food additive use regulations can be found in the International Food Additive Database.

April 23, 2013
N/A

In April, Korea's Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) published the English version of their 2013 Food Additives Code.  The document includes both specification standards and usage standards.  The Code is available in .zip format here.  Further information on Korean food additive regulations can be found on MFDS's Food Additives page.

The new regulation is currently in the process of being analyzed and entered into the International Food Additive Database.

April 23, 2013
N/A

On April 23, 2013, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS) published a Scientific Opinion titled “Scientific Opinion on the re-evaluation of anthocyanins (E 163) as a food additive.”

Anthocyanins are a large group of water-soluble plant pigments and are authorized as food additives in the EU. This scientific assessment re-evaluates the health safety of their use.

EFSA also recently published a report titled “Analysis of needs in post-market monitoring of food additives and preparatory work for future projects in this field”.  The report details analysis methods for prioritized food additives (sweeteners and food colors) in various foods.

The European Union's food additive use regulations are included in the International Food Additive Database

April 22, 2013
N/A

On April 19, 2013, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) published Scientific Opinion on Flavoring Group Evaluation 63, Revision 2 (FGE.63Rev2). The opinion concerns a group of 20 aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters. 

The European Union's food additive use regulations are included in the International Food Additive Database, though flavorings do not fall within the scope of the database.

April 18, 2013
N/A

On April 17, 2013, the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) notified the WTO of several proposed amendments to their Food Regulations. The proposal approves use of several new food additives and includes changes in maximum use levels for existing additives. The final date for comments is June 16, 2013.

The amendments will be included in the International Food Additive Database once they are established and in effect.  Further information on Singapore's food additive regulations can be found on AVA's legislation page.

April 17, 2013
N/A

On April 17, 2013, Health Canada's Bureau of Chemical Safety published “Notice of Modification to the Lists of Permitted Food Additives to Enable the Use of Ammonium Sulphate as a Yeast Nutrient in the Manufacture of Ale, Beer, Malt Liquor, Porter and Stout.” The amendment took effect upon publication.

The International Food Additive Database has been updated to include this amendment. Further information on Canada's food additive regulations can be found on Health Canada's Food Additives page.

April 15, 2013
N/A

On April 14, 2013, The Separate Customs Territory of Taiwan, Penghu, Kinmen and Matsu notified the WTO of a draft amendment to the Standards for Specification, Scope, Application and Limitation of Food Additives.  The proposal affects the specification standard for sodium citrate.  The final date for comments is June 11, 2013.

Taiwan's food additive use regulations are included in the International Food Additive Database.

All News Tags